FAKE IT

FAKE IT


The May 2020 challenge for members of Hornsea Art Society is to produce an original work of art in the style of one of their favourite artists.

Rules: Your artwork can be in any medium, including digital images (Photoshop or similar), iPad 'paintings', sculptures, ceramics, mixed media, textiles, prints, drawings...it's up to you.


Artwork will be judged by ERA President LARRY MALKIN on 1st June 2020.

There will be one outright winner and two runners-up.

CASH by Steve Truelove


Damien Steven Hirst is an English artist, entrepreneur, and art collector. He is one of the Young British Artists who dominated the art scene in the UK during the 1990s. He is reportedly the United Kingdom's richest living artist, with his wealth valued at £215m.

Definitely one of my top five influential artists.


Although in the past he did have an 'army' of artists creating his paintings and sculptures he has recently begun to produce his own individual paintings.

His private art collection is worth tens of millions.

However, since 2018 some of Hirst's creations have lost considerable value in the mad world of 'art investment'...a warning perhaps if you are a collector of his work?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Damien_Hirst

AUBERGE DU LAC by Phil Hargreaves


Cezanne it was who first got me painting when I was a student in Aix-en-Provence as part of my French degree. I used to walk towards the Mont St Victoire on the chemin de Bibemus, retracing his steps.


When I returned to Nottingham I used to copy his work in gouache and he has remained my favourite artist.


I have tried to transfer his later style when he became more and more abstract to the context of a Yorkshire setting but it's difficult because the colours and the light are so different to Provence so it doesn't feel right.


Anyway, it's a start and I'll probably have another go. It's a pub near a lake so I've called it "Auberge du Lac" At least that sounds more like Cezanne!


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_C%C3%A9zanne


.

 

HAND by Stan Pile


My 'Fake It' is inspired by unknown Artists in France and Indonesia around 50,000 B.C.


I think P.P.E. blue seems very appropriate at the moment and mirrors the fears our ancestors would have lived with.


I recommend watching Antony Gormley's "How Art Began" on BBC iplayer, on for the next 2 weeks.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prehistoric_art

 

HULL CITY RIVER FRONT by Stan Pougher


This has been a very enjoyable exercise. First choosing an artist. I settled on Richard Diebenkorn and during this exercise I have been able to learn a lot about him and his methods. 


STEVE:

Though comparatively little-known in the UK, Diebenkorn is widely considered one of America’s great post-war masters. His work can be found in almost every major US collection.

He is strongly associated with California, where he lived and worked for most of his career.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Diebenkorn

 

FABRICASSO by Lesley Webb


I did this last August all out of fabric for our stitching group.


I like Picasso as he has no rules...anything goes....any colour any shape yet you can still see what it is.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pablo_Picasso


 

ABSTRACT AFTER JOAN MIRO

by Stan Pougher


This could become habit forming.......


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joan_Mir%C3%B3


 

STILL LIFE by Helga Carmichael


Inspired by Giorgio Morandi. I love his calm and peaceful work.


STEVE: Italian painter who specialised in still life.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giorgio_Morandi


 

ISOLATION by Steve Truelove


Mark Rothko has always been an inspiration ever since I read his 'recipe' for a work of art. Here is Rothko's seven point recipe...


One.....There must be a clear preoccupation with death...intimations of mortality. Tragic art, romantic art, etc, deals with the knowledge of death.

Two.....Sensuality. Our basis of being concrete about the world. It is a lustful relationship to things that exist.

Three......Tension. Either conflict or curbed desire.

Four.....Irony, This is a modern ingredient...the self-effacement and examination by which a man for an instant can go on to something else.

Five.......Wit and play....for the human element.

Six......The ephemeral and chance... for the human element.

Seven......Hope. 10% to make the tragic concept more endurable.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mark_Rothko

PICONA HOPE AND DESPAIR

by Jean Scaife


My two submissions are both Picasso(ish), plainly and simply because it's a license to go wild. 


I have tried to depict the feelings which the Corona virus is instigating over the country as a whole. The bright colours of hope, and the hair are the colours of the rainbow which has become a sign of the times.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pablo_Picasso


 

O LA PICA by Jean Scaife


This second painting I did because it felt liberating! 


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pablo_Picasso


 

NADIA by Selina Fennell


I hardly dare say it, but this is in the style of Da Vinci. Well at least it's drawn with the same coloured pencil he sometimes used.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leonardo_da_Vinci

 


 

SENTINEL by Steve Truelove


I first became aware of Elisabeth Frink's work when I was at Batley Art College way back in 1964. Along with other sculptors like Reg Butler, Kenneth Armitage, Lynn Chadwick, Hepworth and Moore she was an early influence on my sculpture work.


Frink is probably best know for her bronzes of 'falling figures', 'winged men', 'weird bird like creatures', 'horses and horse heads', and in later years for her life sized threatening 'standing male nudes'. She was part of the 'Geometry of Fear' group of sculptors.


Frink worked in plaster, layering it over a metal armature and then sawing, cutting with a chisel, and sanding with a surform to create an angular distorted form.


In 1982 she was created a Dame of the British Empire. She died in 1993 at the age of 62.  


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elisabeth_Frink


HORNSEA PROMENADE by Phil Ramsdale


In the style of Richard Diebenkorn


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Diebenkorn.

THE BIRD CATCHER by Aileen Marozzi


I recently went to a Mexican Folk Art workshop and the work of Mexico’s best known artist Frida Kahlo was discussed. So she is my inspiration for this and the following picture.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frida_Kahlo

.

THE CAT SCARER by Aileen Marozzi


Inspired by Frida Kahlo.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frida_Kahlo

.

PENSIVE NUDE by Gillian Fitzpatrick


I admire Modigliani and his contempories for their courage to try something new in the face of opposition from the 'salon', and the knowledge that most people would ridicule the elongated proportions and strange, odd eyes. They were not accepted in their lifetime. 


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amedeo_Modigliani

.

WATERCOLOUR by Phil Ramsdale


Inspired by the work of Alvaro Castagnet.


STEVE: Castagnet is a flamboyant Uruguayan painter. Specialises in watercolours.  


https://alvarocastagnet.net/alvaro-castagnet/

.

CLIFF SCENE by Valerie Reeves


Inspired by the work of Glyn Macey.


Tonight (8th May) we should have been meeting Glyn and enjoying his talk/demo and tomorrow taking part in Glyn's workshop. He is one of my all-time favourite artists - lively, interesting and very skilled. Altogether a great guy. So sorry not to see him, but maybe one day?


https://glynmacey.com/

.

JUDY by Judy Flanagan


Modigliani is an artist I’ve always loved since discovering him back when I was teaching. I remember my whole class doing a similar ‘fake it’ project based on the Modigliani style and it was amazing! A treasured memory. So much talent and such a shame his life was so short...!


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amedeo_Modigliani

VIRGINIA by Chris Smithurst


This is something I painted a short time ago without realising it was in the style (ish) of Modigliani until two friends commented on it. I've since found out more about his work and love it.


STEVE: Just as a matter of interest, Modigliani is reputedly the most forged artist ever, with hundreds of fakes being discovered in the last decade or so.....plus many more still hanging on rathet posh gallery walls or in the private collections of the rich and famous........and gullible..


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amedeo_Modigliani

ROOM FOR TWO by Peter Robinson


This is my attempt at an Edward Hopper.

I really enjoyed painting it...!


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Hopper

PORTRAIT OF A WOMAN by Gillian Fitzpatrick


My version of a Leonardo da Vinci.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leonardo_da_Vinci

CLAUDIA WINKLEMAN by Kate Gendle


To be honest I’ve never been that enamoured with Andy Warhol's work but have been wanting to have a play with my silkscreen stuff and I now have a lot of admiration for his prints as it is a lot harder than I had anticipated!


I decided to have a go at screen printing Claudia Winkleman with only two easy colours!! Learnt a lot and enjoyed myself.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andy_Warhol

ME AND MY MUM by Blanche Lee


I love Gustav Klimt....his originality, his colours and of course his emotion.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gustav_Klimt

.

STEAM TRAIN OVER RIBBLEHEAD VIADUCT by Mary Medforth


In the style of Monet.



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Claude_Monet

.

WATERLILIES by Aileen Marozzi


I have unearthed some photos I took at Giverny a number of years ago so that inspired me to have a go at a Monet style waterlily picture but in Pastels.



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Claude_Monet

.

CASTING THE NETS by Blanche Lee


Henry Moore was an 'old boy' at my Grammar school, so I spent most of assembly gazing at his drawings of miners that were framed on the walls....I hope this isn't an insult to him, because he inspired me to keep going.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Moore


V.E. DAY 1945 by Gerry Leggett


This is in the style of LS Lowry. He is an artist I respect very much and very down to earth so I have done my version of V.E.Day in 1945


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/L._S._Lowry



SEASCAPE by Gareth Jones


Always enjoyed Monet's seascapes and just wanted to try and capture a flavour of his genius.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Claude_Monet

FIELDS OF GOLD by Judy Flanagan


This is in the style of Barry Hilton, a contemporary artist that I greatly admire for his portrayal of light in landscape. I was recently able to photograph oil seed rape crops but sadly didn’t have a mountain in the background to add to the distance....so I borrowed one of his!


https://www.whitewallgalleries.com/artists/barry-hilton/originals

SUN BATHING by Ann Jackson


This is in the style of Yuri Krotov a Young Russian Artist from the V I Sourikov Moscow State Art Institute. A leading contemporary Russian Artist. He paints in a quick and free manner using wonderfully fluid brush strokes.


http://artyurikrotov.com/eng/

STAITHES by Ann Jackson


This is in the style of P.L. Hobbs. It is of Staithes a place I have visited many times and enjoyed my visits there.

.

http://www.plhobbs.co.uk/

JAGUAR IN THE JUNGLE by Valerie Reeves


After (a long way after) Henri Rouseeau, primitive painter often called Le Douanier, the customs officer.

I love big cats and also the way Rousseau painted big jungley plants - were they observed or imaginary? I understand that he never left France, but it is said that he may have visited the Jardin des Plantes in Paris.
I began this pic at least ten days before Grayson Perry displayed Rousseau's famous tiger on his programme this week!


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henri_Rousseau


VASE OF FLOWERS by Phil Hargreaves


One day I chanced upon a book on Bernard Cathelin in a second-hand bookshop in France. I immediately fell under the spell and I have chosen to do my second fake-it based on his work. He is a lesser known French artist who worked briefly with Matisse and painted mainly still life, nudes and landscapes. Always vibrant colours, semi-abstract with lots of texture. Check him out. I have never come across his work in galleries or museums but he has been a big influence on my style of painting.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bernard_Cathelin


DISTANT COAST by Ann Roberts


This is a pastel painting in the style of Joan Eardley who worked in Glasgow and in the north east of Scotland until 1963 when she sadly died too young. I was introduced to her work 4-5 years ago and immediately liked her style which is realistic but carefree.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joan_Eardley


JUDY VAN GOGH by Judy Flanagan


In the Van Gogh style (very loose style I must admit!).


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vincent_van_Gogh


SERENE WATER AT BURNBY HALL

by Marion Wright


Here is one of my textile pieces inspired by Monet.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Claude_Monet


PICASSO GOT MY GOAT by Meg Burkill


I have made two plates especially for Fake It. It took me out of my comfort zone but I love a challenge. They are both ceramic plates approximately 12 inches in diameter.


This one is inspired by Picasso who made some fab ceramic plates with goats on that I love. I was a little annoyed by him though as I discovered that he just painted on the pieces and never acknowledged the ceramic artists Suzanne and George Ramie who designed and made the pieces. That's why I’m calling this one Picasso Got My Goat.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pablo_Picasso


MIRO FLOATS MY BOAT by Meg Burkill


This one is inspired by Miro. He did quite a lot of ceramics in his wonderful eye catching style that I adore.

I feel a little warmer towards him though as he insisted that Joseph Lorens Artigas and his son Joan, the ceramic artists whom he collaborated with sign the pieces as well. That's why I’m calling this one Miro Floats My Boat.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joan_Mir%C3%B3


JANE by Chris Smithurst


This one is inspired by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henri_de_Toulouse-Lautrec

PERFECTION IN DUCK EGG BLUE

by Gareth Jones


Another entry for the Fake It page. As you can see I have been painting en plein air and though it is a monochrome I'm sure many members will recognise it in the style of Sir Edwin Lutyens......!!! 


STEVE: I'm confused Gareth. I had it as a dead ringer for that wonderful artist B.Q. Wickes...!


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edwin_Lutyens



WILBERFORCE DRIVE IN HULL

by Stan Pougher


In the style of Benjamin Hope. A contemporary artist. He has only been painting as long as me but with considerably greater success.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Benjamin_Hope

 



WISH I WAS HERE by Jan Stott


I once painted a copy of Monet's 'Woman with a Parasol'. That must have been about 40 years ago and that really was the beginning of my love for his light and colours.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Claude_Monet

 



MES PETITES-FILLES JOUANT SUR LA PLAGE by Jan Stott


Granddaughters playing on the beach....in the style of Monet.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Claude_Monet

 



SUNSET, LEIGH-ON-SEA by Pam Williams


Turner’s range as a watercolorist is extraordinary, but it’s that warm glow in his sunrises and sunsets that I love the most. For this watercolour of the old town in Leigh-on-Sea, Essex, I’ve tried to achieve harmony through Turner’s characteristic contrast of warm and cool colours. I soaked the paper first to establish the contrast, then used dry brush for the ‘cooled warms’ in the sky and ‘warmed cools’ in the central section.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J._M._W._Turner

MIDSUMMER, NEAR BEVERLEY

by Pam Williams


Hockney’s 36 watercolours, Midsummer: East Yorkshire 2004, look so fresh and immediate. There is hardly any wet-in-wet or dry brush, ‘just’ layering of colours and a variety of mark making. He used pots of pre-mixed paints to be able to work at speed. No underdrawing, and effortless design and colour patterning, make the sense of exuberance breathtaking. Here I’ve tried out a variety of marks on wheat fields near Beverely with layers of colour in a cool sky for contrast


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Hockney

.

CONCENTRIC by Debs Crosby


This has been inspired by Hundertwasser. I love his bold use of colour.


This is a textile piece that has been painted onto silk and then machine embroidered and quilted.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Friedensreich_Hundertwasser

WATERLILIES by Debs Crosby


Another favourite artist of mine is Monet and I love the way he created depth in his water lily paintings by using vertical lines in different colours - hopefully I have been able to do the same. I have used oil pastel for the first time in this painting.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Claude_Monet


INTO THE BLUE by Ann Roberts


Inspired by Barbara Rae, another Scottish artist whose bold colours and style I love.  I didn’t throw buckets of water at them as part of the process like Barbara but I used my water spray on wet acrylic to achieve some of the runs and loose marks some of which I enhanced with oil pastel.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbara_Rae

 


SCOTTISH LANDSCAPE by Ann Roberts


Another Barbara Rae inspired creation..

The second piece I did using soft pastel.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbara_Rae


VOIE DE L'EGLISE ATIQUE by Chris Caley


With the deadline looming I trawled through some past works and found an etching I did many moons ago of Atwick (cica1980’s).


I thought it wasn’t unlike a Pissarro in composition, so I decided to give it a go and paint the scene. The palette is similar to Pissarro’s, and that is about all I can say.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camille_Pissarro


LA SALLE FLORALE by Steve Truelove


I'm ashamed to say this took me no more than five minutes (tops) to put together in Photoshop.

Piet Mondrian would turn over in his 'tombe' (In Brooklyn, New York by the way).....


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Piet_Mondrian


THE GREAT WAVE OF HORNSEA

by Phil Hargreaves


Here is my version of Hokusai's classic wood block print which I have re-interpreted in acrylics and called "The Great Wave off Hornsea". I took advice from my Japanese daughter-in-law Kumiko as you will see from the title and signature in the top left-hand corner! Hokusai is an inspiration to all us vulnerable over 70s as he was still painting well into his nineties!


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hokusai


LOU LOU IN A HAT by Sylvia Barker


This is my version based on a Matisse of Lou Lou in a Hat.

It is a combination of his line drawings, cut outs and love of colour.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henri_Matisse

THE TREE WITH HOLES by John Parks


One of my favourite  artists is Clarice Cliff. Commercial stuff I know but never the less a great artist. I love her use of primary colours and naive designs.

My paintings in her style of are based on views along local paths around Hedon where I live.  I have left holes in the trees for the birds to fly through


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clarice_Cliff

.

THE FARMHOUSE by John Parks


Another inspired by the work of Clarice Cliff.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clarice_Cliff

.

NORFOLK COUNTRYSIDE by Phil Ramsdale


Inspired by the work of Edward Seago.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Seago



Hornsea Art Society

hornseaartsociety@hotmail.com